Recommendations

Overall System: PetSafe YardMax

For most installations we recommend the PetSafe YardMax. It is a tried and tested fence that has produced consistent good results for the last decade. The fence has a good mix of value and features. We use the PetSafe YardMax with most of our installation customers and it is by far the most popular system in our online store.

What sets this system apart, is that it is the only wired fence that your dog cannot run through. It is also the only system that lets you set the boundary to extend only outside your yard (instead of both inside and outside) so it leave more space for your dog.

The system has five levels of progressive correction, that self-adjust to take into account the persistence of the dog. We like the long-lasting rechargeable collar battery, and featherweight collar. The collars also have the unique feature of allowing you to tell whether they have been properly fitted. And the system is compatible with wireless indoor and outdoor pods so you can keep your dog out of certain rooms or a veggie garden.

The YardMax is best for dogs over 10lbs. The weakness of the YardMax is that it can only contain a maximum of 10 acres so is not appropriate for very large installations. Also, the YardMax system is NOT cross collar compatible. The system will only work with the YardMax collar and vice versa. 

For a detailed review of the PetSafe YardMax, including pictures and a video review, click here.

Small Dogs: PetSafe Little Dog

For small dogs, (under 10lbs) the Petsafe Little Dog is the way to go. The collars on regular dog fence systems are too big to be comfortable on a small dog. The PetSafe Little Dog has the smallest lightest collar, and reduced correction levels making it the best choice for very small dogs.

The PetSafe Little Dog is also compatible with PetSafe Stubborn and PetSafe Deluxe in-ground dog fence collars. So you can use a full size, full strength collar such as the PetSafe Stubborn, or PetSafe Deluxe to contain other dogs using the same system.

The main disadvantage of the PetSafe Little Dog is that it uses a proprietary PetSafe battery. The battery costs around $10 and only lasts 2-3 months. But, if your dog is less than 10 lbs this is still the only good choice.

100 Acre Capacity: SportDog SDF-100A

For very large yards (over 10 acres), the SportDog SDF-100 is our recommendation. The SDF-100 has a range of up to 100 acres, unlike most regular strength systems which have a maximum range of 5-25 acres. The SportDog is also useful for large yards in cold climates where the extra signal strength lets you power through accumulated snow.

Built by the hunting dog company, SportDog, this system is one of the toughest and most durable systems, with particularly excellent waterproofing. The system also comes with 1,000 feet of boundary wire twice as much as you get standard with most systems.

The main drawback of this system is the collar is one of the biggest and heaviest wired dog fence collars.

317 Comments

  1. Kathy says:

    I have a 70lb pitbull who always wants to jump my neighbors fence. The neighbor hates the dog and I am afraid my dog will eventually bite him. Will these fences keep him away from the fence?
    Thanks
    Kathy

    ADMIN – Hi Kathy. With jumpers, escape artists, or diggers, we usually recommend laying the wire a foot or so inside the fence so that they do not even get to the fence to escape. Then you will want to set a wide boundary width for notification.
    The Boundary Wire should be installed 5-10 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, HVAC equipment, etc) to avoid amplification problems and unintended corrections to the dog’s collar.
    With existing fences, we recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in the location you think you want it and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. This way, if you need to move the wire closer to or further away from the fence, you can do so easily. Once the correct location has been determined, then you can bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or tack it to the surface of the ground using lawn staples to hold it in place.
    Keep in mind that your dog will not receive a correction until s/he actually crosses the boundary wire.

  2. Kerry Yanez says:

    Hi I have a 100lb Malamute who has thick, long, coarse fur. We will be moving and buying a home and don’t really want to put up a fence. What is the best underground electric dog fence system to use for a 3/4- 1 acre of land? Would anyone also be able to install it for is? It would need to be installed inside the house due to not having a garage. Also was wondering if these electric collars work well when it comes to snow or if they are waterproof collars? Illinois weather is bipoalar here lol
    If someone could install the underground electric dog fence how much of a charge would it be?

    ADMIN – Hi Kerry. We are a Do It Yourself site so we do not provide installation. Please visit our Dog Fence DIY reviews page to see our currently available fence systems along with their options and specifications.

  3. Brian says:

    Looking for a collar that will be compatible with the sit boo boo dog fence for a 13 lb Bichon. The collar that came with the system is just entirely too large for a small dog. Will the Pet safe collar for small dogs work with this system? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    ADMIN – Hi Brian. I am sorry. We do not sell the Sit Boo Boo dog fence and do not have a compatible collar for that system.

  4. Mark says:

    I need to ONLY keep the dog from passing thru an automatic driveway gate as people are coming and going. Seems these things are pretty expensive for that sort of small (a length of about 20 linear feet) protection – other ideas?

    ADMIN – Hi Mark. As you do not need a total fence system, I would recommend looking at the Pawz Away Rock Outdoor Zone (RFA-378): https://dogfencediy.com/store/accessories/indoor-zones/pawz-away.html.
    These zones are meant to create an exclusion barrier. For your gate, you would either need two rocks that you would put at either side of the opening to create two overlapping signals or you would need one rock and up to 150 feet of wire to create a one sided boundary.
    With a bit of inventiveness, you can create a single sided boundary. Create a long, skinny loop of boundary wire, remembering to keep the parallel sections a minimum of 6 feet separated to avoid the wires interfering with each other. The key for success of this installation method is run your loop far enough in front of your gate so that your dogs do not run around it.

  5. Debi says:

    Hi – need a recommendation on what system to get for my 2 dogs. One is 6-year-old lab and the other is a 1-year-old lab/beagle/Australian Sheppard. As soon as the one year gets outside her nose takes over and will chase and run in the road chasing cars, or people or squirrels – she is going to get hurt or killed. Of course, the lab will follow her. We have 2 acres and live on a cul de sac. Please tell me what system to get.

    ADMIN – HI Debi. I would recommend looking at a couple of different systems in order to see what your options are. Please visit our Dog Fence Review page.

  6. Tricia says:

    I have a 3 year old 130 pound dobbie Shepard mix he’s fixed and still won’t stay out of the pasture behind our house. He goes threw the normal plain Jain electric fence pursaced at any pet supply store! He just shakes off the jolt ;He has cut himself open on The Bared wire fence and still he goes. Now he has our Rottweilers pups following him! One got kicked by a donkey and died. Short of buying a taser to shock him with don’t know what to do?? Cattle fence? Will it kill him I so don’t want to hurt him!

    I forgot to add we have 1.75 Acres of land Thank you for any help you can give me.

    ADMIN – Hi Tricia. The only fence that we offer that I would recommend looking at would be the PetSafe Stubborn Dog Fence (PIG00-10777).
    PetSafe Stubborn Dog Fence (PIG00-10777) is cross collar compatible and works with MOST PetSafe collars but DOES NOT WORK WITH THE YARDMAX COLLAR. This system would allow you to use the PetSafe Deluxe Collar (Standard correction levels), Stubborn, Elite Little Dog, Cat or SportDog collars. All of these collars are battery operated and have indicators to let you know when the battery needs to be changed. The Stubborn collar has a correction level that starts at 50% stronger than the standard level collars and is good for dogs that have a higher pain tolerance, dogs over 100 pounds, or dogs that are over 40 pounds and hard headed. This system only operates in traditional mode and relies on the strength of the correction to dissuade the dog from running through the boundary. This is a good, reliable system that will work well in most configurations. You would need to order 1500 feet of wire. The shock is a static shock not an electric shock. This is closer to wearing wool socks in the winter and touching a door handle. If you are concerned about your dogs, I would consult with your veterinarian.

  7. Matt Mott says:

    Hi. I have a yellow lab that is 7 yo. I will be moving to a new house in November which is not fenced in. The lot size is a tad over 1/2 and acre, with most of that in the back yard. He is used to an ecollar from duck hunting/training (normally good with a 30-40 setting with a dogtra 1700NCP). So what do I need to know about an inground fence, and what do you recommend for my application?

    ADMIN – Hi Matt. If he has responded well to the training collar, then he should respond to the fence training as it will be a similar training and sensation. Please visit our Dog Fence DIY Reviews page to see the systems we have on offer.
    Call your utility companies (e.g., phone, cable, DSL, gas, power/electric, etc) and have them come out and mark all of your underground utilities.
    We recommend installing the transmitter inside a waterproof area that does not drop below freezing connected to an electrical outlet. The transmitter should be away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, circuit breaker box, HVAC equipment, washer/dryer, refrigerator, etc) to avoid amplification problems, unintended corrections to the dog’s collar or signal interference.
    The Boundary Wire should be installed 5-10 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal or wire fencing, HVAC equipment, other electric fencing, etc) to avoid amplification problems, unintended corrections to the dog’s collar or signal interference.
    We recommend laying the wire on top of the ground and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. Once the correct location has been determined, then bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or you can tack it to the ground using lawn staples.
    Please visit the DogFenceDIY “Planning, Installation and Layout” page.

  8. Laurie says:

    I have two mixed breed husky, lab, border collie dogs. One is the typical escape artist. I have a 4 foot chain link fence enclosing about .75 acres of yard, but she consistently digs under the fence. I could run the wired fencing through the chain link, but I am worried about how well it will hold up to the weather. I live on top of a mountain where winter comes with blizzard type winds, deep snows, and ice storms that coat everything with 1/2 inch of ice. Which would be better, wired or wi-fi?

    ADMIN – Hi Laurie. With jumpers, escape artists, or diggers, we usually recommend laying the wire inside the fence so that they do not even get to the fence to escape. Then you will want to set a wide boundary width for notification. Keep in mind that your dog will not receive a correction until s/he actually crosses the boundary wire.
    The Boundary Wire should be installed 5-10 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, HVAC equipment, etc) to avoid amplification problems and unintended corrections to the dog’s collar. With chain link fences, we recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in the location you want and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. This way, if you need to move the wire closer to or further away from the fence, you can do so easily. Once the correct location has been determined, then you can bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or tack it to the surface of the ground using lawn staples to hold it in place. A traditional style fence is the best option for this need.

  9. -t.k says:

    I have a 95-110 lbs mastive/rottweiler/German Shepherd mix….he has thick fur/rolls of skin under his neck. Had the stubborn collar on him and he would build up the courage and run through it with a yip….and suggestions? I’m moving him from country to the city and cannot have him getting out

    ADMIN – HI TK. Our best recommendation would be to raise the correction level by one, if that’s an option, and go back to remedial training starting with Step 1. Do not move on from step 1 until your dog shows that they understand that step. Also, make sure the collar is fitted correctly. Please visit our Dog Fence Training Page for a reminder of how to train your dog.

  10. Jeff says:

    Hi I have a almost 3 month old Beagle. We have a 3 acre lot. We are close to a country road that she is wondering to. I am afraid she is going to get hit. But more importantly I have young children who are going after her and would like to keep them all safe. What would you recommend?

    ADMIN – Hi Jeff. We do not recommend beginning fence training until the dog reaches 6 months of age. I would recommend looking at a couple of different systems to see which you think will be the best match for you, your property and your dog. Please visit the DogFenceDIY “Planning, Installation and Layout” page. Which of these sample dog fence layouts is similar to your dog fence design?

  11. maria says:

    I have a 6 months great dane that is a very good boy but sometimes he wants to explore neighbor’s gardens. I would like to know the best fence system for him; he is very high at this age I can not imagine how big he will be in the near future. I´ll appreciate any advise from your expertise! Thanks in advanced.

    ADMIN – Hi Maria. What is the weight and temperament of your dog? Have you begun obedience training (sit, stay, down, etc.) with him? If so, how is he responding? What is the size of the pet containment area? Where do you live? Please visit the DogFenceDIY “Planning, Installation and Layout” page. Which of these sample dog fence layouts is similar to your dog fence design?
    Answering these questions will help me match your dog(s) to the best electric dog fence system.

  12. Ashley andrenok says:

    hi I was wondering what fence you recommend for a pitbull puppy which is going to probably be 90lbs full grown. So I need something that will allow me to train him when he’s younger but will be strong enough for when he’s a grow strong dog.

    ADMIN – Hi Ashley. What is the age, current weight, and temperament of your dog? Have you begun any obedience training with him (sit, stay, down, etc.)? What is the size of the pet containment area? Where do you live? Answering these questions will help me match your dog(s) to the best electric dog fence system.
    Also, please visit the DogFenceDIY “Planning, Installation and Layout” page. Which of these sample dog fence layouts is similar to your dog fence design?

  13. Jenna says:

    Hi I have an about 80 pound Siberian husky. What would you recommend I use for him. He likes to dig so regular fences dont work with him

    ADMIN – Hi Jenna. The boundary wire for our electric dog fences can be installed in front of or along the bottom of an existing fence (not metal). This prevents the dog from damaging, digging under, or jumping over the fence. We recommend adjusting the Boundary Width Control Dial on the Transmitter to the appropriate Boundary Width setting. For example, if you set the Boundary Width Control Dial to 6 you will have 3 feet of signal on each side of the boundary wire. This will alert your dog to the boundaries before he even gets to the fence as we want to keep him from getting to the fence.The boundary flags are set at the 3 feet warning zone inside of the pet area. You can place the flags 10 feet apart around the warning area inside the boundary wire.
    We recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in your chosen location and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. Once the correct location has been determined, then bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or you can attach it directly to a wooden fence with wire staples (you can pick these up at most hardware stores. They look like regular staples but they have a notch in them for the wire to pass through).

  14. Billy C says:

    Hello! We have two boxers. One is no problem, but the 42# female uses her jaws to pull at the chain link of their kennel. She has scratched up her face and mangled some wire. She escaped once and we are very concerned for her safety. Our chain link kennel is covered and open on three sides, the gate opens outward. One side is against a brick building where they have doggie door access to beds, heat and AC. We are considering a low voltage electrified system but wonder if perhaps a radio frequency fence is a better option. Which of your systems would you recommend? Please describe the installation process. Thank You!

    ADMIN – Hi Billy. With every purchase comes a 90 page downloadable book, The Dog Fence Experts Installation and Training Guide. This will give you information on how to install the system and how to troubleshoot your install. We also have information on installation on our website.

  15. Lori G says:

    I have 20 acres which I would like to be able to keep the dogs close to the house, so I think a wireless system. But I have two 90+ lbs. dogs and one 12 lb. dogs. What system would be best?

    ADMIN – Hi Lori. What is the age, breed, and temperament of your dogs? Have they has basic obedience training? What is the size of the pet containment area? Answering these questions will help me match your dog(s) to the best electric dog fence system.

  16. Jeff says:

    Hi, what sort of measurements of my property would your company need in order to determine the right amount of coverage for me?

    ADMIN – HI Jeff. To help you determine the best electric dog fence for you and your dog(s), we would need some basic information. What is the age, weight, breed, and temperament of your dog(s)? What is the size of the pet containment area (1/3 acre, 1/2 acre, 1 acre, etc.)?

  17. Steve says:

    I have a chocolate lab, dachshund and papillion that I need to be contained to my front yard. Back is fenced, but every now and then they get out the front and run around the neighborhood. Area of coverage is about 10′ on each side of the house extending down about 30′ to the road and then about 60′ paralleling the road. Also, what do you do with the wire going across the driveway? thanks.
    Steve

    ADMIN – Hi Steve. You will need 500 ft of Boundary Wire to contain your dogs in 1/3 acre loop. What are the ages, weights, and temperaments of your dogs? Answering these questions will help me match your dog(s) to the best electric dog fence system.

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