Basics

Dog Containment Systems and Pet Containment Systems

How a Dog Containment Fence Works

Dog Containment Systems, also known as Invisible Fences*, Pet Containment Fences, Radio Fences, Dog Fences, or Underground Fences, work using three main component:

  • Transmitter Box – the transmitter box usually resides in the your home or garage and sends weak radio signals out through the boundary wire. The controls on the transmitter box control how wide the signals radiate out from the boundary wire.
  • Boundary Wire – the boundary wire is laid around the perimeter of your yard to mark the boundary line that your dog cannot cross. There are wireless dog fences that do not require boundary wire, but they have drawbacks like less precise boundaries.
  • Receiver Collar – the receiver collars are worn by your dog, and listen for the radio signal sent out through the boundary wire.  When the dog nears the boundary wire, the receiver collar beeps to warn the dog to retreat. The collar corrects the dog with a mild static shock if they do not retreat.

To learn more about the different kinds of Dog Containment systems take a look at our Reviews of Dog Fence Systems or Dog Fence Recommendations to figure out which fence would work best with your dog.  Or learn about planning and installing your system and training your dog.

Why a Dog Fence Works

The dog learns there are negative consequences for approaching the boundary and so learns to avoid the boundary.  In much the same way we learn not to touch a hot stove by being told that it is bad and having a couple of bad experiences touching a bad stove, the dog learns not to go near the boundary by us training it to think crossing the boundary is bad and by having a couple of bad experiences going near the boundary and receiving the correction.  Psychologists call this process Operant Conditioning.

Idle Speculation

We have been installing Dog Fences for a while now, and have a theory as to why they are so successful.  We think that Dog Fences mimic the boundaries a dog would have in nature. The closest relatives to our domestic dogs were nomadic but they had boundaries. The boundaries were marked by geographic features such as waterway or biological features such as the presence of competing animals as indicated by scent. The wild dog knows where it is safe to go and more importantly it knows where it is not safe to go.

The domestic dog does not have any of that.  It is not obvious to the dog that it cannot go outside your yard or that it cannot go onto the road. The dog fence fills the gap. It gives your dog a territory and teaches them that leaving the territory without you can be dangerous.

You will find it fascinating to see the change in your dogs once they learn their boundaries. Dogs that were running wild, digging under traditional fences or darting out open doors seem to transform. Suddenly, they are happy in their territory. The dog is at peace and does not worry about things outside the boundary, it does not even see them.  We speculate that dogs crave boundaries and that the dog fence provides the boundaries they crave.

187 Comments

  1. Gail says:

    We have had a Petsafe buried wire fence for several years and love it – our dogs (we seem to always have one Lab and one Corgi) respect it perfectly. Problem is we have a new very active Lab who goes into whatever of my many garden areas after I have been working in there and does a lot of destruction. Is there a movable system that we can employ – even if it needs a different collar but operates in a way they are used to that we can set up (this would be inside our 2 acre in ground wire area, but needs to be portable since the dog loses interest after a bit). I read about some fences to take while camping or on the road, but wasn’t sure what I am asking for.

    ADMIN – Hi Gail,

    You can use wireless units or create perimeters within perimeters.

  2. Jo Jo says:

    I have a toy yorkiepoo that is only a puppy. She will probably weigh 5lbs. when she is full grown. Is there a system that will work for this size dog. I am researching this type of fencing for future use.

    ADMIN – HI Jo jo. Because your dog is so small, we recommend contacting your veterinarian to see if an electric fence is a good fit for your dog due to size. If you do decide to try an electric fence, we recommend the PetSafe Elite Little Dog PIG20-11041.

  3. Renee Linstead says:

    We have a 70 pound German Shepard already trained for use with electric color. We would now to install an underground fence. We have a 1/2 acre lot, so I’m figuring about 555 ft of wire. Do you have a brand you recommend? We have been looking at the Sport Dog or Extreme Dog system (don’t care for the batteries in that one.) Do you have any knowledge that could point us in the right direction as to the best brand?
    Thanks much,
    Renee

    ADMIN – Hi Renee. I would recommend looking at the SportDOG SDF-CT: https://www.dogfencediy.com/reviews/sportdog-contain-train/
    SportDOG SDF-CT Dog Fence is the only system that offers Containment and a Remote Trainer on the same collar. You can have up to 3 dogs on the system and still use the remote feature. This collar is rechargeable and is appropriate for dogs 10 pounds and up but is bulky. This collar is also waterproof to 5 feet. If you do not need the training function on the collar, this system is also cross collar compatible and works with MOST PetSafe collars but DOES NOT WORK WITH THE YARDMAX COLLAR. This system would allow you to use the PetSafe Deluxe Collar (Standard correction levels, good for dogs between 5 and 90 pounds, $69.95), Stubborn (for large dogs or dogs that need more corrective power that are over 40 pounds, $79.95), PetSafe Rechargeable In-Ground Fence Receiver (A rechargeable collar with 4 correction levels ($119.95), Elite Little Dog (for dogs under 10 pounds, $99.95), Cat or standard SportDOG collar ($99.95) collars. These collars would work for containment only and WOULD NOT offer the remote function. This system only operates in traditional mode. This is a good, reliable system that will work well in most configurations. The transmitter will power up to 100 acres of containment boundary wire. This system comes with 1000 feet of 20 gauge wire.

  4. Lynn says:

    I have 2 large dogs.
    The Female was a rescue that already had a history of running.
    A 2 year old 86lbs long hair Female German Shepherd I had her fixed a few months ago and she is gaining weight because she can’t exercise properly her lead line only allows her from the deck 30 feet and that just isn’t enough.
    A 1 year old 87lbs medium hair German Shepherd male pup out there with him. he is fixed as well but I can let him run in my back yard as long as i’m standing there so he gets a lot of exercise so his shape is good.
    My property is just under an acer I would like them to have use of almost all of it.
    the outer rim I would like to use is L 249′ x W 90′ x L 265′ x W 83′ that still leaves me with a 10′ border all the way around from where they could go to the property lines.
    She loves to run off and play in the woods and pond behind my property.
    He only runs when she gets away but he comes back fairly quickly she doesn’t come back till shes worn out and dirty.
    They are both used to wearing collars but I have not had much luck with her responding to the collar if there is an outside stimulus like deer or rabbits and I have plenty of both on my property.
    I hate that she bothers my neighbors when she gets away but she is very friendly.
    Is there a system that would work for her that won’t cost us 2000.00 to 2800.00 because the system I had quoted is just something I can’t get my husband to go for at this price he would rather put in a regular fence and that would limit the use and give me even more work to do since I take care of everything. I want my dogs safe and to have fun with the most freedom possible.
    Any suggestions ?

    ADMIN – Hi Lynn. I would recommend looking at two different systems to get an idea of what your options are for your dogs:
    PetSafe Yard Max PIG00-11115: https://www.dogfencediy.com/reviews/petsafe-yardmax/
    The YardMax is a good, strong reliable system with a few extras such as the YardMax mode. This mode offers a run-through deterrent that would give a continuous correction for up to 15 seconds or until your dog returns into the yard once crossing the boundary. The YardMax collar is rechargeable with a lithium ion battery and has 5 correction levels so it can pack a good zap, if needed. The collar also has indicator lights that let you know if it is fitted correctly or if the battery is running low and needs to be charged. This collar is appropriate for dogs between 5 and 90 pounds. The YardMax collar will ONLY work with the YardMax system and vice versa. This system will support up to 10 acres of wire.

    SportDog SDF-100A Dog Fence: https://www.dogfencediy.com/reviews/review-sportdog/
    SportDog SDF-100A Dog Fence is cross collar compatible and works with MOST PetSafe collars but DOES NOT WORK WITH THE YARDMAX COLLAR. This system would allow you to use the PetSafe Deluxe Collar (Standard correction levels, good for dogs between 5 and 90 pounds, $69.95), Stubborn (for large dogs or dogs that need more corrective power that are over 40 pounds, $79.95), PetSafe Rechargeable In-Ground Fence Receiver (A rechargeable collar with 4 correction levels ($119.95), Elite Little Dog (for dogs under 10 pounds, $99.95), Cat or SportDog (most rugged and waterproof collar and is meant for dogs that are hunting or farm dogs ($99.95)) collars. All of these collars are battery operated and have indicators to let you know when the battery needs to be changed. This system only operates in traditional mode. This is a good, reliable system that will work well in most configurations. The transmitter will power up to 100 acres of containment boundary wire.

  5. John dorosk says:

    I have 6 acres to perimeter. What wire gauge to use?
    A 60 # German shepherd, whasystem do you recommend?
    How high on a fence can the wire be mounted?, is 4 ft ok?
    Love your website!
    John dorosk

    ADMIN – Hi John. We are glad you like the site! I would recommend looking at the PetSafe In-Ground Fence PIG00-13661: https://www.dogfencediy.com/reviews/petsafe-pig0013661/
    PetSafe In-Ground Fence PIG00-13661 is cross collar compatible and works with MOST PetSafe collars but DOES NOT WORK WITH THE YARDMAX COLLAR. This system would allow you to use the PetSafe Deluxe Collar (Standard correction levels, good for dogs between 5 and 90 pounds, $69.95, THIS IS THE COLLAR THAT COMES WITH THIS SYSTEM), Stubborn (for large dogs or dogs that need more corrective power that are over 40 pounds, $79.95), PetSafe Rechargeable In-Ground Fence Receiver (A rechargeable collar with 4 correction levels ($119.95), Elite Little Dog (for dogs under 10 pounds, $99.95), Cat or SportDog (most rugged and waterproof collar and is meant for dogs that are hunting or farm dogs ($99.95)) collars. All of these collars are battery operated and have indicators to let you know when the battery needs to be changed. This system only operates in traditional mode and does not offer the run through deterrent. This is a good, reliable system that will work well in most configurations. This system will support up to 25 acres of wire.
    For 6 acres, you will want to order 2500 feet of wire. This will leave you with some leftover but it’s never bad to have some extra wire on hand in case of a wire break.
    We do not recommend attaching the wire to a physical fence due to the fact that the dogs do not receive the correction until they cross the wire. If it is attached to a fence, then the dog is out of containment as they are receiving the signal and therefore may trap them outside of the containment area.
    With existing fences, we recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in the location you think you want it and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. This way, if you need to move the wire closer to or further away from the fence, you can do so easily. Once the correct location has been determined, then you can bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or tack it to the surface of the ground using lawn staples to hold it in place. If you do decide to attach it to your physical fence, we recommend no higher than 1 foot off the gorund and then setting a wide boundary so that the dogs receive the maximum notification.
    Keep in mind that your dog will not receive a correction until s/he actually crosses the boundary wire.

  6. Je says:

    I have a rescue we think is Catalouha Leopard Cur mix female just under 50lbs, esimated 1-2 years old and spayed. She’s sweet and sensitive but won’t respect fence boundaries. I can keep her if I can contain her. It’s 22 acres of ranch property with horse shock wire fencing. What would you recommend? Planning on only fencing approximately 15 acres due to layout. Also can the box be placed next to the horse shock wire box? Thanks in advance!

    ADMIN – Hi Je. I would look at the SportDog SDF-100A Dog Fence:
    SportDog SDF-100A Dog Fence is cross collar compatible and works with MOST PetSafe collars but DOES NOT WORK WITH THE YARDMAX COLLAR. This system would allow you to use the PetSafe Deluxe Collar (Standard correction levels, good for dogs between 5 and 90 pounds, $69.95), Stubborn (for large dogs or dogs that need more corrective power that are over 40 pounds, $79.95), PetSafe Rechargeable In-Ground Fence Receiver (A rechargeable collar with 4 correction levels ($119.95), Elite Little Dog (for dogs under 10 pounds, $99.95), Cat or SportDog (most rugged and waterproof collar and is meant for dogs that are hunting or farm dogs ($99.95), this is the collar that comes with this system) collars. All of these collars are battery operated and have indicators to let you know when the battery needs to be changed. This system only operates in traditional mode. This is a good, reliable system that will work well in most configurations. The transmitter will power up to 100 acres of containment boundary wire.
    To get pricing, you can click on the Add To Cart button on the right hand side of the review page. This will take you to a page with a light blue box with several drop down menus on it. This is where you can add or remove wire, upgrade wire, or select any other add on’s you may want/need. The pricing will update in real time, allowing you to get quotes for everything you may need.
    We recommend installing the transmitter inside a waterproof area that does not drop below freezing connected to an electrical outlet. The transmitter should be at least 5 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, circuit breaker box, HVAC equipment, washer/dryer, refrigerator, etc) to avoid amplification problems, unintended corrections to the dog’s collar or signal interference.

  7. Esther Crayton says:

    I was given a dog that the previous own estimates to be about one year old. She is said to be a Cocker Spaniel / Lab mix. She now weighs 24 pounds and according to the Vet is at her full size. She spent most of her first year in her cage, and she is now quite wild, chasing down the front chain link fence and baking wildly at passersby. She has demonstrated that she can climb/jump a three foot chain link fence and digs deep holes. My front fence is 3 foot (chain-link) and two sides of the property are 6 foot chain link and the last side is a 6 foot wooden fence. When she is barking at people or animals outside the yard, she completely disregards and call, whistles, etc. from me. She is completely focused on her mission. She is a lovable dog and I have become attached to her, but I need a solution. We are on a busy street and she disturbs the neighbors and frightens or angers some who pass close to the fence.

    Since she digs, as well and climbs or jumps, I imagine I need to enclose the entire .7 acre property with an invisible fence. Which would you suggest? Do I need another device to correct the barking?

    Thanks for any advice you can give.

    ADMIN – Hi Esther. With jumpers, escape artists, or diggers, we usually recommend laying the wire a foot or so inside the fence so that they do not even get to the fence to escape. Then you will want to set a wide boundary width for notification.
    The Boundary Wire should be installed 5-10 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, HVAC equipment, etc) to avoid amplification problems and unintended corrections to the dog’s collar.
    With existing fences, we recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in the location you think you want it and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. This way, if you need to move the wire closer to or further away from the fence, you can do so easily. Once the correct location has been determined, then you can bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or tack it to the surface of the ground using lawn staples to hold it in place.
    Keep in mind that your dog will not receive a correction until s/he actually crosses the boundary wire.
    Currently, there is not a fence system that offers a collar with a built in bark deterrent. for that you would need a separate collar.

  8. Angelica says:

    Hi. I have a 5 year old lab mix who has separation anxiety. When we leave our home we put her outside, she has ruined the door frames, the doggy door, and window screens. We are worried about her hurting herself. Would this work to keep her from going near the doors and windows and just staying put in the backyard until we let her come in? What would you recommend?

    ADMIN – HI Angelica. Yes, it could! Is your current yard fenced in already? If so, we have a couple of options for how you can create a one sided boundary against the home or you could create an exclusion zone in front of the entrance to the home. Feel free to call us or drop us an email so that we can help answer any questions you may have about these options! You can find all of our contact info by visiting us at DogFenceDIY.com.

  9. Ann Lewis says:

    Hi, we have two dogs, a lab and a standard long haired dachshund (huge, he’s 32 pounds and not fat). We also have a vacation property that is shaped like a T, with our house at the bottom. We are surrounded by neighbors with things like open compost piles that are a huge attraction to the dogs. Also, do dogs learn easily that it ok to walk across the boundary if they are on leash (obviously without the collars)?

    ADMIN – Hi Ann. We would recommend a wired system as it would give you the ability to customize the shape of your containment area. To teach the dogs that it is sometimes ok to cross the boundary, we recommend building that into your training in step 4. You will want to take the dog to the same place on the perimeter each time you want to go on a walk. Make the dog sit, attach the leash to their regular collar, remove the fence collar and then let them know it is ok to cross. Consistent training will help the dog know that when you do these things, the dog can then cross but ONLY when these steps are performed.

  10. Melanie says:

    I have 6 acres fully fenced, but our 18 month old black lab has started digging. Can I attach the e-fence at the top of the fence, to avoid cutting with the weed eater. TIA

    ADMIN – HI Melanie. With jumpers, escape artists, or diggers, we usually recommend laying the wire a foot or so inside the fence so that they do not even get to the fence to escape. Then you will want to set a wide boundary width for notification.
    The Boundary Wire should be installed 5-10 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, HVAC equipment, etc) to avoid amplification problems and unintended corrections to the dog’s collar.
    With existing fences, we recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in the location you this you want it and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. This way, if you need to move the wire closer to or further away from the fence, you can do so easily. Once the correct location has been determined, then you can bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or tack it to the surface of the ground using lawn staples to hold it in place.
    Keep in mind that your dog will not receive a correction until s/he actually crosses the boundary wire.

  11. Tammy says:

    We have 3 King Charles Spaniels and 1 Springer Spaniel. Two of my Kings Charles no longer can hear. The one climbs the current fence I have and our Springer jumps over it. We live on 24 acres, but would only want to fence about 2-3 acres. What do you recommend to stop our dogs from roaming and not coming back home?

    Thanks,
    Tammy

    ADMIN – The only system collar that would offer vibration and be an appropriate correction level for your dogs may also be too large for them; the SportDog SDF-100A Dog Fence.
    SportDog SDF-100A Dog Fence is cross collar compatible and works with MOST PetSafe collars but DOES NOT WORK WITH THE YARDMAX COLLAR. This system would allow you to use the PetSafe Deluxe Collar (Standard correction levels, good for dogs between 5 and 90 pounds, $69.95), Stubborn (for large dogs or dogs that need more corrective power that are over 40 pounds, $79.95), PetSafe Rechargeable In-Ground Fence Receiver (A rechargeable collar with 4 correction levels ($119.95), Elite Little Dog (for dogs under 10 pounds, $99.95), Cat or SportDog (most rugged and waterproof collar and is meant for dogs that are hunting or farm dogs ($99.95), this is the collar that comes with this system) collars. All of these collars are battery operated and have indicators to let you know when the battery needs to be changed. This system only operates in traditional mode. This is a good, reliable system that will work well in most configurations. The transmitter will power up to 100 acres of containment boundary wire. Please note, this is the bulkiest of collars and my not be appropriate for dogs under 30 pounds.

  12. Amanda says:

    We are on 4 acres, and are looking into a containment system for our two boxers. Suggestions? I liked the idea of wireless, but it seems that’s not as good of an option. Also, how about the Invisible Fence brand? Is it worth it to have them come and professionally install?

    ADMIN – Hi Amanda. Wireless fences are good IF you have the appropriate property for them to work well. They are prone to be overly sensitive to obstacles.
    REQUIREMENTS FOR SUCCESSFUL WIRELESS FENCE:
    You Have a Single-Unit Home
    Your House Is At Least 20 Feet From The Road and at Least 20 Feet From Your Neighbor’s Property
    Your House Does Not Have Aluminum Siding or Stucco, no metal fencing or chain link
    Your Property Has Minimal Landscaping and no outbuildings, no tall, thick trees
    Your Property Does Not Have Moderate to Severe Sloping
    Your Dog Is Older Than 6 Months and Weighs More Than 8 lbs.

    Wooded areas prevent the signal from communicating a consistent containment area. The wireless signal communicated from the fence controller needs a direct line of sight with the fence boundary in order to provide a consistent boundary. An inconsistent boundary could cause random corrections to your dog from the collar or could allow for holes in your fence allowing the dog to escape.

    Invisible Fence does offer full service dog fencing starting with planning and layouts, installation, training and maintenance. This can be a great option if your budget allows for it. Full service companies can be prohibitively expensive but it may be worth having them come out and give you a quote.

  13. Carla says:

    I have a Scottie/schnauzer cross who is an escape artist when it comes to getting through fences. I am hoping that by installing an electronic fence we will be able to contain her, and she can enjoy being in our fenced yard with us.
    We also have a redbone coonhound, which we may want to include in the system in the future.
    What system would be best suited for us?

    ADMIN – Hi Carla. With jumpers, escape artists, or diggers, we usually recommend laying the wire about a foot or so inside the fence so that they do not even get to the fence to escape. Then you will want to set a wide boundary width for notification.
    The Boundary Wire should be installed 5-10 feet away from metal and/or electromagnetic interference (e.g., metal siding, aluminum siding, metal roof, metal fencing, HVAC equipment, etc) to avoid amplification problems and unintended corrections to the dog’s collar.
    With existing fences, we recommend laying the wire on top of the ground in the location you want and testing the collar to make sure it beeps and corrects at the right location on the perimeter loop. This way, if you need to move the wire closer to or further away from the fence, you can do so easily. Once the correct location has been determined, then you can bury your wire 1″ – 3″ in the ground or tack it to the surface of the ground using lawn staples to hold it in place.
    Keep in mind that your dog will not receive a correction until s/he actually crosses the boundary wire.
    Please visit our Dog Fence Review page to see what systems we currently offer.

  14. Kimberly says:

    I have 3 dogs of various sizes, ranging from 23lbs to 90lbs. I have 3 acres and a pond. The property to partially fenced. Is there a system I can buy that doesn’t have to make the connecting loop?
    Desperate,
    Kimberly

    ADMIN – HI Kimberly. All of the wired systems that we sell require a complete loop for the system to work. However, there are layouts that allow for 2 or 3 sided containment. Please visit our Dog Fence Layouts page for ideas and diagrams.

  15. John K says:

    Hello,
    Thanks for this resource. Very informational.
    The back of my property is low and quite frequently wet. Can I run the containment wire through an old garden hose so that I van locate it easier in the event of a break or malfunction?
    Thank you.

    ADMIN – Hi John. Yes, you can run the wire through an old garden hose. Just remember to remove the metal ends of the hose so that you do not receive any interference or magnification of the signal.

  16. Cyndi Roether says:

    We have a cat (about 9 lbs), she has been de-clawed and spayed. We live in a forest area on 2 acres with the normal wild animals. We enjoy sitting out on the front deck (about 10′ by 35′). We would like to take her out on the deck with us but do not want her to leave the deck. Can the small dog fencing system be used for a cat? I assume we would go up and over the front door to make a loop. Can we make a separate loop for the back porch? We have only had her for about two months, but she seems really interested in the outdoors and I am afraid she will go out and we will have to track her down. Thank you.

    ADMIN – Hi Cyndi. You could use the small dog system for your cat. However, there is also a Pet Safe Cat Containment system. The collar is extremely lightweight and is appropriate for cats as small as 6 pounds. The static correction is also calibrated for a cat.

  17. Diane says:

    I have two acres I need wiring for and am going to buy 1,500 to 2,000 linear ft of 14 gauge wiring. My local electrical supply store wants to know what material for the wire and coating. Can anyone please advise?

    ADMIN – Hi Diane. We recommend using solid, copper core wire with a durable coating that is rated for direct burial, such as a polyethylene coating.

  18. Jim says:

    I recently installed an invisible fence and all seemed well until my little guy tried walking out the backdoor and got zapped. The wire runs above the door well out of the boundary width (I have it running along a fixed fence which he can walk beneath the wire is closer to him there than the door situation). Its almost as if the aluminum frame of the door is picking up the signal. Is this a possibility?

    ADMIN – Hi Jim. Yes, I believe that you have found the problem. The aluminum frame of the door is probably picking up the signal and amplifying it so that it is correcting the dog in the wrong location. You may need to move the wire farther from the door frame in order to minimize the amplification.

  19. Tina says:

    I have a 5 yr old yellow lab mix. He has been in an electric fence for about 6 months. He does well except when another dog walks past his yard. We have a street right up to his fence on 3 sides of our yard. It is a very small yard. He goes after the dog and scares us and the dogs owner. You can tell he is being shocked the whole time. This happens usually so quickly we have no time to try and stop him. Our neighbors are nervous about this because he is a big love able baby any other time. We have had his collar turned up to the highest level but he still goes after the dogs. There are dogs, usually smaller ones, who we have our friends bring their dogs in the fence and then Bubba plays with them. He doesn’t go after these dogs just the ones who the owners don’t trust him to bond with. I want to stop him from going after any dog. Help!

    ADMIN – Hi Tina. Which system do you have? How high is the correction level set on the collar? If he is running through the boundary, it sounds as if you need to drop back to some remedial training with a higher correction level if possible. I would begin at Step 1 for training and stay there until the dog no longer wants to go over the flags. If you need reminders on the training steps, you can find helpful information and videos on our Dog Fence Training page.

  20. Peter Hopkins says:

    I live on a lake with 250′ of shoreline. Normally, this requires 2 double loops to cover the other 3 sides using almost 1500′ of wire.
    If I opt for a single loop, can I run 14 gauge underwater wire and sink it out in the water.
    OR
    is there a type of wire that can be buried that doesn’t broadcast a signal (insulated?)??
    Can I run two double loops totaling 1500′ on one transmitter?

    ADMIN – Hi Peter. You can run the wire in the water without a problem. If you want to give some extra added protection to the wire, you can run the wire that is going to be under water through an old garden hose (make sure to cut the metal ends off).

  21. heidi stuckman says:

    I have.large oak trees in my yard. my Doberman loves to chase the squirrels that live in them. What will prevents him from braking boundaries? He stays in the yard but his companion, a 50 lb. Schnauzer/Border collie out runs electric collars and they are gone for hours, sometimes days. I would so like to let them out at the same time without loosing them. What system could work for us?

    ADMIN – Hi Heidi. I would recommend taking a look at the PetSafe YardMax. This system would work for both of your dogs and offers a “run-through prevention” that should make your dogs think twice before bolting. When your dogs cross the boundary wire, the correction in YardMax mode will continue for a full 15 seconds or until your dog returns into the containment area.

  22. rebecca says:

    HI. I have a 9 month old standard poodle. She is medium energy but loves to find her way out of our fenced yard and dig up the neighbor’s yard. My yard is a single city lot and narrow. My question is about the driveway. It is on one edge of my property and goes past my house to the garage in the back yard. All doors open onto it. Is there a way to put a wire over it that won’t just be damaged after a few weeks of driving over it, especially in the Central New York winters? Should I just go with a wireless system that might overlap my neighbors’ yards?

    ADMIN – Hi Rebecca. You can run your wire through an expansion joint in the concrete or you can cut a seam into the concrete to run your wire through. Once you have the wire in the seam, you would want to cover it with weatherproof silicon caulk to keep it in place and protect it. You can find more about how to plan your layout with your driveway on our Installation; Driveways and Paths page.

  23. Nicole says:

    Hi, Your site is terrific and informative. I think we’re going to get the Pet Safe yard max and will take your suggestion of the thicker 16 gauge wire. I can’t seem to find a price for the upgrade, please let me know. Thanks again, Nicole

    ADMIN – Hi Nicole. What is the age, weight, breed, and temperament of your dog(s)? What is the size of the pet containment area? Answering these questions will help me match your dog(s) to the best electric dog fence system.

  24. Jess says:

    Hi
    We have a high energy 9 year old 70lb shepard/lab mix that likes to run and wander. We have about .75 acres. I’m a little worried he may try to “take a hit” and still run past the boundary – what would you recommend?

    thanks!

    ADMIN – Hi Jess. You will need 1000 ft of wire to contain your dog in a 3/4 acre perimeter loop. Have you looked at the PetSafe Yard Max Electric Dog Fence PIG00-11115? Please visit the DogFenceDIY “Planning, Installation and Layout” page. Which of these sample dog fence layouts is similar to your dog fence design?

  25. Margaret says:

    My house is built on top of a gently sloping small hill. The 5 acreage was once farm land and has small levees that would keep the soil from washing away. Would this interfere with transmission. I have a lab/retriever, a shepard mix, and a shnauzer. What type of fence do I need?

    ADMIN – Hi Margaret. Yes. You can run the Boundary Wire along the sloping hills to contain your dog. You will need 2,000 feet of Boundary Wire to contain your dog in a 5 acre perimeter loop. Have you looked at the PetSafe YardMax – PIG00-11115 in-ground dog fence? The YardMax has a rechargeable collar and “run-through” prevention to keep the dog safely contained.

  26. Carsten Reerslev says:

    I have an 8 month old ½ (maybee more) Jack Russel and ½ Danish Swedish who loves to even bracke out of the house through the cat-doors. Do you have anything for the European market, Europe has 230 V. ?

    ADMIN – Hi Carsten. I’m sorry for the inconvenience, but our sales and support are limited to the United States coverage area. Therefore, we are required to only do business and process shipments within the United States.

  27. katie says:

    Hi, I have a 35 pound terrier mix that likes to chase anything and everything, a 70 pound bulldog that likes to go with and a 60lb mix that would rather just lay around. If i’m going to get a fence I would be getting collars for all 3. The yard max with the run through prevention seems like the best solution, but I’m also curious if it would be strong enough for my bulldog. We have a petsafe 400 collar, would the stimulation on the yard max be comparable to any of the settings on that?

    ADMIN – Hi Katie. What is the size of your pet containment area? The PetSafe YardMax PIG00-11115 electric dog fence can handle a 10 acre yard. Yes. The settings are comparable with the PetSafe 400 Training Collar.

  28. Fred Bean says:

    I have an 800 foot fence connected to my house to enclose about an acre and half for my dogs. We just got a ittle dog (about 36 pounds) kind of a lab / doberman / tazmanian devil breed. She goes under the fence anywhere she wants. I would like to string the boundary wire through this fence and then bury it around the house so the dog can go in an out of our slider to the house but we can contain her otherwise.

    Can this work OK with your system. Can you send me a quote for the system for this dog and this arrangement?

    Thanks
    Fred

    ADMIN – Hi Fred. Congratulations on your new dog! What is the age, weight, breed and temperament of your other dogs? Is your fence metal? You will need 1,500 feet of boundary wire to contain your dogs in a 2 acre perimeter loop. Have you looked at the PetSafe YardMax PIG00-11115 electric dog fence?

  29. Rhonda says:

    I am wonder what kind of fence would work for a cavapoo

    ADMIN – Hi Rhonda. What is the age, weight and temperament of your Cavapoo? Answering these questions will help me match your dog to the best electric dog fence system.

  30. Alice says:

    I am wondering if I could use invisible fencing to keep dogs out of an area? Is that possible? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks

    ADMIN – Hi Alice. What is the age, weight, breed and temperament of your dog(s)? What is the size of your pet containment area? Answering these questions will help me match your dog(s) to the best electric dog fence system.

  31. Amanda says:

    When choosing whether to upgrade to a thicker wire or not, what is the best rule of thumb to help me choose the best for my needs?

    ADMIN – Hi Amanda. Will there be a lot of traffic (e.g., mowers, string trimmers, aerators, wildlife, tree debris, gardening) near the boundary wire? You will also want to consider seasonal high and low temperatures that also contribute to wire breaks. If so, we recommend upgrading the 20 gauge wire (that comes bundled with the system) to a stronger gauge wire (e.g., 16 gauge, 14 gauge).

  32. Steve Youmans says:

    We have 3 dogs, all about 5 years old… 60 lb Labrador retriever, 65 lb golden retriever, and 55 lb shepherd/basengi mutt (nicknamed houdini). We are moving to a spot in the country with about 1 acre. The lot is sloped in the front and back yards. We are wanting to contain the dogs in about a 1/2-2/3 acre area. I know the slope might cause some issues with the wireless systems. Is the wired system more reliable in this instance. Would we be required to cut into concrete driveway to bury wire?

    ADMIN – Hi Steve. Yes. Under ground dog fence systems have more precise boundaries and are more reliable. We recommend crossing hard surfaces (e.g., driveways, sidewalks) by placing the Boundary Wire in a convenient expansion joint, or create a groove using a circular saw and masonry blade. Place the Boundary Wire in the groove and cover with an appropriate waterproofing compound. For best results, brush away dirt or other debris before patching. We also recommend crossing gravel or dirt driveways by placing the Boundary Wire in a PVC pipe, or garden water hose to protect the Boundary Wire before burying 1-3 inches in the ground. You will need 1,000 feet of boundary wire to contain your dogs in a 1 acre perimeter loop. I would not recommend a wireless dog fence for your 3 dogs. The slope will cause signal problems and make it difficult to contain your dogs. Many customers have tried using wireless dog fence systems with Labs, Golden Retrievers, and German Shepherds and have experienced containment problems. Also, the breed of your dogs tend to take the risk of the correction when tempted by things outside of the boundary area. I would recommend the PetSafe YardMax PIG00-11115 underground dog fence because of the run-through prevention feature. Instead of the collar correcting only inside the boundary zone, the correction on the Yard Max is a timed event. When the dog’s collar moves directly over top of the boundary wire, the collar will deliver the warning beep. If the dog’s collar moves outside of the boundary loop, the collar will deliver a correction for up to 15 seconds. If the dog turns and retreats back inside the pet area, the collar will immediately stop correcting. This means your dog will not be able to “run through” the dog fence. The YardMax system works great for dogs that are contained near busy roads or highways. The YardMax can handle a 10 acre yard.

  33. Samantha says:

    We have just over 1 acre of land. The property is fenced all around, but we are having issues with our beagle digging out. It is not on a regular basis as we fill in his new hole when he gets out and it is another few months or so before he gets out again (it has happened 4 times in the last year). Would adding a simple electric fence to the existing physical fence line be beneficial, or would the beagle still be a beagle and figure out how to get out?

    ADMIN – Hi Samantha. Sorry to hear about your Beagle digging out. Does your fence contain metal? You will need 1,000 feet of boundary wire to contain your dog in a 1 acre perimeter loop. Have you reviewed the PetSafe YardMax PIG00-11115 underground dog fence? Simply install the boundary wire 1-3 inches in the ground in front of the fence and adjust the boundary width control dial to the appropriate boundary width setting (1ft to 10ft). The dog will get a beep and then a correction as the dog approaches the boundary wire in front of the fence. Your dog is safely contained and will not be able to dig out.

  34. Bill Wright says:

    We have an 8 month old German Shepherd Puppy and an existing under ground fence system that only works some times with him , was wondering what system you would recommend using.

    ADMIN – Hi Bill. What is the weight and temperament of your 8 month old German Shepherd? Does your puppy understand and follow the basic commands (e.g., come, sit, stay)? What is the model number of your existing under ground dog fence system? What is the size of your property? Are you going to contain your puppy in a perimeter loop?

  35. Shay says:

    Hi
    I have loved your website it is very informative, but I would still like you professional opinion. I have two dogs, a 3 yr old 11 pound jack Russell and a 6 month old mini Australian Sheppard he ways 14 pounds now but I think he’ll get to about 20 pounds. What fence would you suggest for them?
    Thanks

    ADMIN – Hi Shay. Do your dogs understand and follow the basic commands (e.g., come, sit, stay)? What is the temperament of your dogs? The PetSafe YardMax PIG00-11115 in-ground dog fence works for dogs 10lbs and up. What is the size of your yard? Will you be containing your pets in a perimeter loop? The YardMax can only handle a 10 acre yard.

  36. Mari says:

    Hi! I have had an invisible fence for 10 years and love it. About 4 years ago I had my house “tented for termites” and the guys demolished the wire. I purchased new wire from you and my handyman installed it and it worked beautifully…. until now! 🙁 All of a sudden the system is not working. There is no beeping coming from the transmitter — just a solid green light that slowly blinks — which I believe is a sign that the transmitter is working. No beeping so that should mean no breaks in the wire. I replaced the battery in the collar — it works only with a stand alone unit I use indoors — but not outdoors. I checked to be sure the frequency is correct and it is! What do I do? Thanks in advance for your wonderful help!!

    ADMIN – Hi Mari. What is the model number of you under ground dog fence system? Did you recently experience a thunderstorm? What is the model number of the stand alone unit that you use indoors?

  37. Bob Ronan says:

    Saw a containment fence in the neighborhood that was run thru a culvert under the driveway! About a foot below the driveway surface. Is that effective? Seems like a lot of dirt/asphalt/steel/rock for the signal to penetrate …

    ADMIN – Hi Bob. We recommend placing the Boundary Wire in a PVC pipe or water hose to protect the Boundary Wire before burying. Cut a trench 1-3 inches deep along your planned boundary. We do not recommend cutting a trench 12 inches due to the distortion of the radio signal through the Boundary Wire. Also, metal and steel objects can interfere with the radio signal in the Boundary Wire.

  38. Megan says:

    Hi, I am researching to buy a wireless invisible fence system for my 80lb golden doodle. I would like it to cover approximately 1 acre. A few I have seen mention Wi-Fi and I am in a rural area were that is not available, any ideas would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Megan

    ADMIN – Hi Megan, for the area you are wanting to fence, the PetSafe Stay + Play is the best wireless dog fence. It will cover up to 3/4 of an acre. The collar is robust. The system is easy to set up. The collar is also rechargeable, lightweight, and waterproof.

  39. BRITTNEY says:

    Hello, I am completely new to the underground fence. I do not know what “twisted wire” is and so on. I don’t know what I need. I have two very large Great Danes. We just purchased a new home and there are several, friendly, neighborhood dogs running around. Although we have 10 acres, the neighborhood dogs hang around the house. We don’t mind the neighborhood dogs, however we do not want our dogs to learn the habit of just wandering off. We would fence in approximately 4 acres. What product would be best for us? What supplies do we need? Thank You!

    ADMIN – Hi Brittney, go with the PetSafe YardMax for your Great Danes. Upgrade to the 2,000 foot kit. I highly recommend upgrading to 16 gauge for a durable wire. The twisted wire is the set of wire that starts at the property line and leads back to the wall transmitter. It is twisted so that it does not activate the collars when the collars cross the twisted wire. If your wall transmitter is installed more than 10 feet away from your property line, you will need twisted wire. You can buy it in a 100 foot roll from us or you can make it from regular boundary wire.

  40. Luka says:

    Hey! I have a medium-large thick-furred Malamuth-Shepherd mix, and with thick furred I mean thick. She has a super thick, wooly underfur, and a long haired-coat on top of that. She’s also an escape artist and has been leaving our 3 acre property and running around wild to hunt. She’s a timid dog, but she is also an explorer, and while the shocks might scare her, I would rather have her a little scared than her run over. I have tried to use a shock collar, but the collar simply doesn’t shock her due to the fact that her fur is too thick for the prongs to actually touch her skin. I’m looking for an electric fence system, something that works in tons (a metre and a half for sure) of snow, rain, heat, and something sturdy. Also, I would like to fence my entire acreage, and I have a driveway made of packed gravel (it’s long) and while I can manage to place a wire underground, if I did so could I drive over it? Any suggestions? Ideas? I’m really on a time limit here (hyperactive dog stuck in the house most of the time)

    ADMIN – Hi Luka, I would recommend the PetSafe YardMax for your Malamute mix. The YardMax mode alone is worth it. For your thick furred friend, you will need to thin the fur with scissors and/or shave her neck at the point where the contact points will touch the skin. Otherwise, any underground dog fence will be ineffective.

  41. Candy Ries says:

    Hello ADMIN: We have our Ragdoll cats on the wireless fence and they have no escapes! We now have an Australian Shepherd pup, she is now 11 weeks old, and is friends with the cats. She consistently sits, downs, paws (shakes) and is getting her “come” and “stay” reinforced. She is a very smart pup. Can we start training her on the fence? I know it is recommended to wait until 6 months, but I am so ready to open the doggy door!

    ADMIN – Hi Candy, most dogs are ready for dog fence training between 3 to 6 months old. If your puppy can learn sit and stay, then they are ready for dog fence training.

  42. Kathleen Boettger says:

    I recently moved to a new house with a yard bordering a large empty grassy area that is perfect for playing and very tempting for any dog I end up getting. I know the previous owner had dogs and I have found a electric fence transmitter box in my basement. It’s labeled Home Free. I haven’t been able to dig up any information about this system. I have no idea how old the system is or where the wires have been placed. I of course do not have collars. From what I’ve read here the wire can work for any transmitter so it shouldn’t be hard to get it working again. What I’m wondering about is finding where the wire is buried if I decide to get a physical fence and whether it is still usable.

    ADMIN – Hi Kathleen, the only way to locate where the wire is buried and if the wire is still intact is with a dog fence transmitter and collar. This will require the purchase of a dog fence so you can plug it in and use the collar to locate the boundary wire.

  43. Tabitha says:

    We have two big labs who have broken through the fences to go in the neighbor’s yard several times and so we have replaced the fences several times. They do not dig they bite the fence or use their paws to break through. What is the best method to prevent our dogs from continuing breaking the fences. We have a large back yard with 3 sided fenced yard. They have never broken out of the gate to go out through the front; it is always the dogs wanting to play with the other dogs. Please help! Thank you, Tabitha

    ADMIN – Hi I would recommend the PetSafe Stubborn for two large labs. You can circle the fence with boundary wire and create a boundary zone buffer that keeps your labs several feet off the wire. This should quickly prevent them from chewing through the fence and leaving the safety of your property.

  44. Chris says:

    Hi we have (1) 7 yr old 5lb yorkie and (1) 6 yr old 14lb toy poodle. They were city dogs from birth and were leashed at all times when outside. We have just moved to a 10 acre property in the country and have 1 acre of clear area around the house that we would like both dogs to have access to. Over the winter I was able to make a “snow barrier” 🙂 to contain them while outside, but with the weather about to get nice I want them to be safely contained. What in ground system would you recommend for my kids? The yorkie can be very skittish and I am worried she will become scared of going outside; the poodle is a quick learner and should be fine. Thank You!

  45. Scott says:

    I have a large, very athletic mixed breed in a fenced yard, but he easily jumps the 5′ tall HOA approved fence even after I added height with reinforced poultry netting. I am considering an invisible fence because we would be unable to keep a dog we cannot contain within our yard. If I ran the boundary wire around the entire perimeter of the backyard fence, would I then run twisted wire around the entire perimeter of the sides/rear of the house? There are no areas around the house itself that I am trying to restrict – I am simply trying to keep him in a yard where the physical border(s) allowed by the HOA is not enough.

    Thank you in advance for any advice you can offer in my unique situation…

  46. chaletnoll says:

    We have two 45 lb. lab mix mutts. Our yard is 3 sloped acres…900 ft of perimeter. Which system do you recommend? thanks!

  47. Felicia A Nowicki says:

    I have 3 dogs all different sizes a 75 pound American bulldog mix a 10 pound Chihuahua mix and a five pound terrier mix puppy that will probably reached 40 pounds maximum. what kind of fence would be best for 1/3 acre yard ?

  48. Laura says:

    Hello there, I just sent you an email but thought I would put this here as well.

    Question on dog fence regression.
    Hello there, I am not sure if you are a person that could give us some advice, but if you can we certainly would appreciate it.

    We have a 3 year old lab mix we adopted last July. We put in the electric dog fence in August, did the training and he took to it really well, and we have had zero problems up until now. Over the past few days he has been walking through the fence. We replaced the collar battery and tested it and it seems to be working fine, but he was still walking through it. We then turned up the power and I started the training again. When he is on the leash he jumps away as soon as he hears the beeping, and once he realized where the boundary was he would not go near it again. My husband then hid on the road and we let him out again, he walked right down the driveway through the fence without any hesitation.

    We are really at a loss as to what to do now. If you have any ideas we would love to hear them. Thank you if you can help!

  49. Alex says:

    I have a fenced in yard except for an opening in the parking pad/driveway (about 20 feet across) that goes out to the road and the neighborhood. What are my best options for putting in a small fence/zone to contain our dog in the yard and keep him from going out through the driveway? I noticed the rock away zone accessory. But I dont think the 12′ diameter would do the trick. We have an electrical outlet out by the driveway. What would be the best option to do? Could we just get a small amount of wire?

  50. Ken and Marti says:

    A precious, yet willful young australian cattle dog just adopted us. We have 35 acres of unfenced wilderness adjacent to a lake. The topography is extremely rocky with sandstone, rolling hills and a hardwood forest. Burying a electric fence would be very difficult, if not impossible. We would like our dog to have a lot of land to explore on his own. Is it conceivable to wrap the electronic fence around rebarbed stakes and post throughout the forest? Also, he is so willful, and a breed seemingly adverse to pain……..we are concerned that the electric fence will barely be a mild deterrent. Any suggestions you may have would be extremely valuable. Also, we intend to travel with him to our summer cabin, can you recommend a portable containment system?

    ADMIN – Hi Ken and Marti, yes, you can install the wire on the stakes, but you cannot wrap it. You will need to zip tie it. The signal will not be able to transmit properly when wrapped. I would strongly recommend the SportDog SDF100A fence which is designed for strong, willful breeds. For a portable unit, the best out there is the PetSafe Stay + Play. Now, it’s limited to 3/4 of an acre, but it’s the easiest for portability.

  51. Brian H says:

    my question is there a electric dog fence, that does not need to go around the entire area (a single or double wire system that can just end and not have to compete a loop). My back yard has a PVC post and rail fence around part of it and a stockade fence or house around the rest. my dog can only get out through the post and rail part. So i was hoping to run the wire inside the rail which is hollow. my power comes from a shed and there is about 140′ of Post and rail fence on each side. so if i could run the wire to the end of this fence and stop (note not a complete electrical loop). otherwise to go around the entire yard would include driveway and walkway issues.

  52. Jen says:

    Hi, We have 2 dogs, both mixes. One is 25 lbs, the other about 60. They keep either breaking pieces of our wooden fence or digging under it, getting out. Would a containment fence work? Thanks

    ADMIN – Hi Jen, for your mix of dogs, the PetSafe YardMax is a great fit.

  53. Rob says:

    Can you use an IF to keep a dog out of a certain area? It seems like the buried wire is merely a boundary that would trigger a shock if crossed in either direction. I want to keep my dogs from stealing eggs out of my chicken coop.

    ADMIN – Hi Rob, yes we have zones that you can encircle the chicken coop to successfully keep your dogs from entering.

  54. Naomi says:

    My husband and I are thinking of getting a dog soon (probably a collie or something of similar size) and I would want to install and underground fence. The only problem is that we live on a large farm. I would love to give the dog free reign on our land, but 63 acres is a very large area to be installing a fence, any suggestions? Our property is bordered on 2 sides by road, 1 side by a ditch and the other by a neighbor’s fence. -Naomi

    ADMIN – Hi Naomi, we do have the SportDog SDF-100A which can contain up to 100 acres. Also, we have the YardMax which has a capacity of 10 acres.

  55. jackie says:

    I have a 4.9oz. mulitpoo I would like to have a wireless system but it looks like the collars would be to heavy.

  56. Tom says:

    Hi! I am trying to determine which system is best for my dogs. I have two dogs (a six pound yorkie and an 18 pound poodle). My property is about a half acre in size. I plan to make one loop around the outside of the property. Based on the size of the dogs, which system would you recommend? What gauge wire and how much wire? Thank you! Tom

    ADMIN – Hi Tom, the best fence for your dogs is the PetSafe Basic Inground fence PIG00-13661. The fence comes with the Deluxe collar which you can use on your 18 lb poodle. Then bundle in the PetSafe Little Dog collar for the smaller guy. You will need to add an extra boundary wire kit to the order to cover your property. I highly recommend upgrading to 16 gauge for a break proof wire.

  57. Jack says:

    I have a 11 month old lab mix (around 40 pounds) and she has a ton of energy. We have a fenced in back yard, but just recently she has learned how to climb the fence and has now escaped 4 separate times even with someone watching her. I have considered a number of solutions, one of which is an invisible fence. Is it possible to run an electric fence around a metal chain linked fence or will the metal fence cause interference? If so, what type of fence should I use?

    ADMIN – Hi Jack, Yes this is a great way to run a dog fence and it’s highly successful at immediate containment. I would recommend the YardMax. It has a small, rechargeable collar.

  58. Don says:

    Dumb question – When you use the twisted wire do you attach your fence wire with one connector? The fence wire has one wire, the twisted has two. Do you attach the one wire to the two wires with one connector? Or do you attach one end of the fence wire to one of the pair in the twisted wire, make the loop and then attach the other end of the fence wire to the remaining twisted wire?

    ADMIN – Hi Don, Yes, you will attach one open lead of the twisted wire to the boundary wire. Loop the boundary wire around the property and then attach the boundary wire to the second open lead of the twisted wire.

  59. Trisha says:

    I read somewhere that the collar should not remain on the dog longer than 12 hours at a time because it could cause irritation or a sore. If you can’t leave it on then what?

    ADMIN – Hi Trisha, the manufacture recommends that time limit to be overly cautious. For owners with outside dogs, we recommend you perform regular inspections weekly. Remove the collar and make sure your dog’s skin is clean and healthy. That’s it.

  60. Sudhir says:

    I have a pool on my property and want to prevent the dog from going into it (especially in the fall/winter) when there is a cover on. How can I use the system to keep the dog out of an area, rather than contain her within one?

  61. Jody says:

    We have moved into a house with our 2 dogs a year ago. Last night the neighbors informed me that a few house owners ago, there was an IF installed on our property. I haven’t found a transmitter box in the house, but have found strange wiring near the garage and around the yard that isn’t completely buried over the past year, now I know what that wiring is! 🙂
    What, if anything, can I do so I can utilize this for my dogs? Having an IF is something my dogs would just love!

  62. Gerri says:

    Hi, I have 2 dogs, a lab and a lab/terrier mix. The neighbor has 4 dogs who charge the metal fence between our properties and bark, so my mix also charges, and I’d like to stop these confrontations using some type of additional restraint that won’t allow him to charge the fence. The neighbor’s fence line covers about 1/3 of our 2 acre lot. The lab doesn’t need to be restrained since he ignores the other dogs. What system should I use?

    ADMIN – Hi Gerri, I would recommend the PetSafe Ultrasmart fence for your application. The collar is slim and rechargeable and should work great for keeping your terrier off the fence line.

  63. Steve says:

    I’ve been looking at both a wire fence and wireless options. I live in a townhouse end unit and would use the common land next to the house. It would not be a large area and it’s recommended to use double loop system but placing the wires 5-6ft apart causes me to loss area. Any recommendation would be helpful. My area would be like a “L”.

  64. Michele says:

    I have 2 German Shepherds and one day maybe 3. We are moving to a 2 acre lot of land and the neighbor’s dog is on a radial wireless system that overlaps into our yard. How can I keep my dogs contained and keep his out of my yard? Will the two systems interfere with one another? And I heard that there are systems that will continue to correct when they escape the perimeter. What’s my best option? We are also low budget but want to keep our kids safe. So many products and so little help at all the pet stores. One of my shepherds is very stubborn. The other is very laid back.

    ADMIN – Hi Michele, if you decide on installing a wired in-ground fence, there will not be interference with the neighboring fence. However, you will not be able to keep the neighbor’s dog out. You would need to ask the neighbor if decreasing their signal radius is feasible for their containment setup. For a fantastic, reliable dog fence on a budget, I would highly recommend the PetSafe Inground Fence PIG00-13661. It is $159.95. You can use the collar that comes with the Inground Fence for the laid back Shepherd and buy the PetSafe Stubborn collar for the other Shepherd. The Stubborn collar is compatible with the PetSafe Inground.

  65. Gary Gribbell says:

    Will all brands of collars work with all brands of containment. In other words is it an electric field that all brands recognize, or is is brand [frequency ] specific. Wondering if a pet safe collar will work on an electric fence wire

    ADMIN – Hi Gary, the systems are frequency specific. The only brand specific fences are: PetSafe Inground Fence PIG00-13661, PetSafe Little Dog, and the PetSafe Stubborn fence. A dog fence collar will not work on an electric fence wire because the dog fence technology is a radio frequency technology, not run on power. In other words, the dog fence wire is simply a broadcast antenna.

  66. Jamie says:

    Hi there,
    We have a 4 year old lab/pit bull mix with full access to our yard through a doggie door. We have also recently learned that he can clear our 6 foot fence (with no vertical slats for leverage) extremely quickly. We are considering an electric fence for the backyard only, but have a few questions- could you help?
    — We would like him to have access to the doggie door/inside, so making a full circle boundary isn’t our best option. I’m assuming we would need to twist the wire to cancel the circuit or make a double-circle type ring around our fence?
    — Given that he might hop over the fence w/out much effort, would you advice putting the fence wire in the ground or on the fence? We would prefer it on the fence, but aren’t sure if this would be effective with his escape tendancies. (We still can’t see him hop it in action- he only does it when he knows we have been gone for a while.)
    — We tried implementing a wireless system in our last house for him. He learned VERY quickly, but within 2 days was too afraid to leave the house to poop because of the shock; We removed it and I re-trained him to understand there was no longer an electric boundary in the ground. I’m very concerned that the shock would have to be associated with a physical boundary (ex: fence) for him to be comfortable being in the yard.
    — We have two small children and aren’t the handiest family on the block. 🙂
    — What brand and type would you reccommend for this kind of dog/family?
    Thank you for any advice!

    ADMIN – Hi Jamie,

    (1) You can make a three-sided loop, running the wire along the top of the fence, then doubling back on yourself along the bottom of the fence to complete the loop.

    Alternatively, you can go along the three sides of your yard, then to complete the loop run the wire up a downspout, across the gutter, and down the downspout on the other side of the house.

    (2) You can mount the wire on the fence, or place it in the ground – both will work. I would fence mount the wire – it is considerably easier.

    (3) The way we introduce the correction is very gradual. The dog first spends the first week with no-correction learning the boundary. When the correction is introduced in the second week – the dog knows why it is happening and how to switch it off, reducing any anxiety. When properly trained the dog will only get the correct a few times. If you do the training, you should not have any problems with the dog becoming comfortable with the new boundary.

    (4) Happy to make a recommendation, but I need a little more information. What is his temperament like – does the Lab or the Pit Bull dominate? DO you know his approximate weight?

  67. Patricia says:

    Hi, I have just adopted a Yellow Labrador/ Anatolian Shepherd dog. I have been reading about these two breeds. My new dog is 6months old and is already 50 lbs. The Anatolian is a guardian dog of ancient origins, the yellow labrador is well a lab. Our new dog is very much a mix, at times she is all 100% puppy and loves to be very busy chewing and romping around the house. Other times she is so quiet and contemplative, she seems quick to want to please and obey (Lab?) and yet, we see her stubbornness come through in her resistance to being led on leash at times.

    Anyhow, all that to ask, do you think my dog who is this mix of breeds would work okay with a underground wire electric fencing and if so which one would be the wisest option?

    thanks
    Patricia

    ADMIN – Hi Patricia,

    Where a dog is a mix, unless there is suggestion to the contrary, I usually choose the fence for the tougher breed, in this case the Anatolian. With large guardian breeds like Anatolians, they often need a quite strong correction to get them to take notice, because they have been bred to be very stoic and insensitive to pain (exactly what you would want from a dog out protecting your livestock).

    The reason we pick the stronger fence is that if it turns out the dog doesn’t need a lot of correction, we just keep the fence on the lower levels and there is no problem. If we choose the weaker fence, and it turns out the dog needs a stronger correction, there isn’t much we can do.

    A good system for your pup would be the PetSafe Stubborn. With the training, I would expect complete containment even with a purebred Anatolian, being part lab will make it even easier.

  68. teresa corbin says:

    we have lost 3 dogs in one year , 2 due to people driving too fast down the road. one to old age. have got a little terrier now and would like to contain him safely in our 1 quarter lot yard. how much would this cost to do?

    ADMIN – Hi Teresa,

    Sorry to hear about your dogs, that is a difficult year.

    An electronic dog fence for a quarter acre lot would cost in the $200 – $300 range. Happy to make some more specific suggestions and give you an exact cost, I just need a little more information on the Terrier’s breed, age, weight, and temperament.

  69. Karen says:

    We are looking for a solution to keep our cocker from running out of the front gate at the top of our driveway. Other than this small area, the yard is completely fenced. Is there a wireless solution you’d recommend?

    ADMIN – Hi Karen,

    To block just a small area, the wireless Outdoor Pods made by Pawz Away are a great choice.

    You can put these collars in wireless mode and create a boundary up to 16 feet in diameter, or you can run up to 150 feet of boundary wire from the pod.

  70. Patricia Chinni says:

    I have recently moved to 3 acres of property at Possum Kingdom Lake in west Texas. It adjoins with acres of property that are not developed. I have 2 German Shepherds and a Blue Heeler that I need to keep on my property. They do stay near my home but more people are moving into the area and may not appreciate visits from friendly but large dogs. What type of system would you recommend? I am looking at having an underground system professionally installed. Thanks.

    ADMIN – Hi Patricia,

    Particularly with the two German Shepherds, having one of the stronger systems would be advisable. I would use a PetSafe Stubborn system.

  71. Sam says:

    We recently moved into a rental house with our 7-month-old Retriever-Plot Hound mix. She’s about 45lbs now, and still growing. She was in an apartment before, and used to being on a lease when we were outside. Now we have a long backyard that she loves, and she’s pretty good at respecting the boundaries of unless she’s lead by another dog or squire, or my fiance comes home from work. She’s also pretty receptive to training, comes when called (most of the time) and stays close to her “humans”. Since home is a rental, we’re thinking an e-fence would be our best, most cost effective option. My parents also have one, so we thought it’d be easier to take her home when we visit as well (they have extra collars).

    Just wanted your take on the best product line. Is the PetSafe UltraSmart our best option, or would you recommend somethings else?

    ADMIN – Hi Sam,

    For a retreiver / plot hound mix, I would choose the PetSafe Ultrasmart. It is a very nice reliable fence, and the size and correction are well suited to those energetic breeds.

  72. Warwick A says:

    Hi guys, I own a 4000sq/ft bay in a building, and bring my 4 month old black lab to work with me every day. Recently she has been exploring and is walking through the fence on the side and into the street. I can’t keep my eye on her all the time, but I can’t close the fence because I share it with a few other bays. I would like to cover a square footage space of about 12000 including outside, and the space is in the shape of a rectangle. Is there a wireless system that would work for me? If not is there any system where I could run a wire 15 or so feet above ground? It’s all asphalt so I can’t bury anything under ground, and if I leave it on the ground it will get destroyed by vehicles instantly. Please help!

    ADMIN – Hi Warwick,

    I don’t have any great options for you.

    I don’t think wired solutions are going to work for you because of all the asphalt. Running the wire up 15 feet above the ground will stop the signal being received down at ground level, so I don’t think that is going to be a solution.

    You could try the wireless Havahart Custom, which would let you have a custom shaped boundary, as long as the building doesn’t have a metal roof, or metal siding walls. When it works it works well, but they don’t work for a significant number of people.

    If the dog is only getting out through the gate, we could use a wireless pod to block just that one area.

  73. Mark J says:

    I am currently living in a rental with 5 acres of land. We have a barbed wire fence on 2 sides of our property that 2 of our 3 dogs love to crawl under and find sheep parts to bring back. One is a 110 pound 4 y/o yellow lab who is really strong willed (we got her from a rescue, she spent 3 years tied to a 8 foot rope) so she loves to explore. The other is a 7 month old black lab that is 30 pounds and she will probably top out at 40 pounds or so. I want to attach to the barbed wire fence on the 2 sides of our property, and will use fence posts on the other 2 sides so that I can give access to a creek that runs through the property.

    So my big question, which system do you think would be best for my description?

    ADMIN – Hi Mark,

    With the yellow lab being so big and hard-headed, I think the Petsafe Stubborn system would be a good choice. You can also use an extra PetSafe Stubborn collar with the small black lab, but will want to have it turned down to the lower setting.

  74. Susan says:

    We inherited an PetSafe RF 1010 system when we purchased our house 2 years ago. The house is right in the middle of a rectangular 1.7 acres. We got a 10 month old rescue dog in December. He is a aussie/golden mix, very sweet and very smart. Until now, we walk him in the nearby open space and let him run around the neighborhood as he stays fairly close to home and always comes back. We don’t want to press our luck so we think we are all ready to use the containment system. When I plugged it in, the two red lights showed a break in the containment wire. I hired someone from Invisible Fence (per website) to come and fix the break. The guy said there were several breaks and the signal is very faint due to degrading wire. Then he wanted to sell me a new system. Can I use that system and simply (simply, not necessarily easily?) retrench a 14 or 16 gauge wire around the perimeter of our lot? I would need to purchase a collar as we didn’t find one lying around. What would be the most cost effective and otherwise efficient and effective way to approach this situation? Thank you.

    ADMIN – Hi Susan,

    You can indeed use your current system with a new collar and new wiring. The three collars that will work with your transmitter are the PetSafe Little Dog (dogs <12lbs), PetSafe Deluxe (12 lbs - 50 lbs) and PetSafe Stubborn (50 lbs +).

    Before you invest in the collars, I would check the transmitter is working, by creating a short dummy loop and checking to see if the error lights go off.

    PS - if you use a trencher with a wire guide (available at tool rental stores), it is not a big deal to do 2 acres and will take around 2 hours.

  75. Ashley Samuelson says:

    Hi! I have three full blooded labs…One is extremely protective and I cant trust him when my neighbors come outside…(We only have one neighbor) He is a 110lb black lab. He actually charged at one of the neighbors children. Then I have two female labs around 65lbs each. One of them is just very curious and likes to run off every now and then. The other female is the friendliest dog ever, she loves people and never really leaves the property. So I don’t have a lot of money to spend and I have almost an acre of land to cover. Is there any way I could get two collars instead of three..since I don’t have any issues with the one female. Would it be just as effective if I only trained two dogs instead of all three. And if i was to get the fence with the wire that u put underground is there any warranty on these systems because I’ve heard several people say that if u have a bad spot in the wire then you have to go around searching for it. Basically, I need the cheapest type of fence that will be effective. Id rather have rechargeable collars too. Thank you for any advice

    ADMIN – Hi Ashely,

    You don’t have to put collars on dogs that are not as escape risk. If you had to skip one of the dogs, I think you have the right idea to leave the collar off the most submissive. I would still however train the dog on the collar, so that at least during the training phase they get some experience on the fence.

    The wire can develop breaks. This is not covered under the warranty (because it is usually caused by someone accidently cutting through the wire, rather than any defect in the wire). When this happens, you do indeed have to hunt for the break. But, there are tools that help you find the break (so you don’t have to dig it all back up).

    A good choice given that your two dogs are so different in size would be the Dogtra EF-3000 which is rechargeable.

    If you could live with a disposable battery, the PetSafe Inground would also be a good choice and is a little cheaper.

  76. Tally Baldwin says:

    I have 3 dogs that like to roam in our neighbors yard. I currently have the Pet Safe Portable wireless fence. I purchased that because we live on a lake and I want them to not go into the neighbors yard yet be able to swim. I would like an electric fence that can be buried but can let the dogs swim. In other word I would only need 3 sides. I hope this makes sense! Please help as the neighbors are getting mad! The Pet Safe works great but I just can’t pull it in to cover the area I need.

    ADMIN – Hi Tally,

    To get a wired fence to work along only three sides on a lakefront lot, you have a few options.

    The first would be to run the wire along three sides of your lot, then double back on yourself six feet apart to make a large U-shaped loop. The second option is to make a loop around all four sides but to make one side non-active by either running the wire high up in the air (using nearby trees if available), or running the water deep out into the lake and sinking it to the lake bottom.

    You can see some lakefront diagrams in our Installation –> Layouts section.

  77. Keri Davis says:

    Hi, I have a rottweiler / border collie mix and a Jack Russel, they both love to run and have recently found out they are eating the neighbors chickens/eggs. I have a total of 3 acres with about 1-1/2 of if being yard and the rest wood. Which system would work best with these 2 dogs? Do you recommend wireless or in ground? Can the box be outside under shelter or does it have to be indoors like a garage? Thanks!

    ADMIN – Hi Keri,

    With the wooded area in your property, a wired fence is a better choice because the trees will not interfere with it’s signal as happens with wireless systems.

    A good choice would be the SportDog SDF-100A, using the included collar for the larger dog. For the Jack Russel, you could add the compatible PetSafe Little Dog collar.

  78. Claudia says:

    We have new rescue dog that has a good amount of retriever in her. We have a fenced in yard that also has a pool in it that we would like to keep her out of. Is it possible to set the perimeter around the pool only, leaving her free run of the rest of this yard?

    ADMIN – Hi Claudia,

    Yes, you can run the boundary wire just around the pool perimeter to keep the dog out of that area (instead of using it for containment).

  79. Andy says:

    Can the transmitter be located under an open porch? (Traditional front porch with roof but no side walls) Are there any weatherproof boxes/covers available?

    ADMIN – Hi Andy,

    You can place the transmitter on an open porch as long as it is out of the rain. If it is going to get rained on, you will want to put it in a waterproof box as you suggested. We don’t sell them, but you can get them at any big box hardware store in the electrical section.

  80. Kelsie says:

    Hi: We have a puggle which is about 20 pounds and a terrier mix which is about 50 pounds. The terrier loves to be outside which includes the neighbors houses where he gets treats from. We also live in the woods and have about 4 acres where we have a large pond in out front yard and 2 creeks and would like to let them swim in. Do you have water proof collars? We also have a neighbor who has horses and they use an electric fence would that interfere with the dogs fence? We are on a budget and would love to get a fence soon.

    ADMIN – Hi Kelsie,

    (1) Most (but not all) of the collars are waterproof.

    (2) An electric livestock fence will not interfere with an electric dog fence.

    (3) You will want a fence that lets you have independent correction levels for each dog on the system because they are so different in size. We would also want a collar that is smaller and lighter because of the Puggle. A couple of good options would be the Dogtek EF-6000 and the PetSafe Inground. They are both excellent systems. The Dogtek is a little more expensive, is rechargeable, and has a few extra features. The PetSafe is cheaper, but uses a disposable battery and does not have as many frills.

  81. Meghan says:

    Hello! We have 2 adult dogs (35lbs+) and 1 new 12 week old puppy (currently ~10lbs, will grow to be 50lbs+). They are all mixed breeds and LOVE to dig. The oldest female (german/basenji mix) has even started breaking through our fence boards. We are on a bit of a budget, so what would be the best fit for the pocket and 3 determined dogs?

    ADMIN – Hi Meghan,

    With those three dogs of different sizes and breed, we need a system that can set the correction level independently for each dog. The cheapest good option that meets those needs would be the PetSafe Inground. (I presume you need less than (10 acres contained)

    PS – for the puppy you will want to wait until she is around six months old to start training. But, observing the two older dogs respect the boundary will help her a lot in learning/

  82. Matthew Wright says:

    Hi, we have two maltese poodle crosses, Bailey and Shadow that are both under a year old. They are extremely active and love to run around our backyard and play but have been getting more and more bold and mischievous. We would like to put in an invisible fence for our back yard and about 1/2 of our front yard, crossing the driveway. Bailey is about 12 pounds (may only get a little bigger) and Shadow (bred with a toy poodle) is only 5 pounds (maybe 8-10 pounds fully grow). For that reason we want collars that are programmable separately. What package would you recommend? Thanks

    ADMIN – Hi Mathew,

    With dogs that small, the PetSafe Little Dog would be your best best, particularly for Shadow. The Little Dog has collars that are by far the lightest and smallest. The collars on that system are separately programmable, and the correction levels are scaled down for smaller dog.

  83. Heather says:

    Our 40 lb German Shepherd mix keeps escaping out the front door. We’ve had little success training the dog to stay inside despite an open door OR training the people (i.e. 6 y.o. son) to close the door. We thought an electric fence for the front yard might work. However, our dog would need to wear the collar in the house (we’d take it off at bedtime). I’ve heard of accidental shocks in the house d/t other electrical appliances. What are your thoughts? Any recommendations on systems with less likelihood of accidental indoor shocks? Thanks, Heather

    ADMIN – Hi Heather,

    None of the modern systems will be triggered by electrical appliances. This was a problem in the early days of electronic dog fences (1970s / 1980s), but it no longer an issue that you are ever likely to encounter. If you are just trying to stop the dog busting through the front door, perhaps one of the wireless indoor pods will be a cheaper and easier solution?

  84. Pam Johnson says:

    Hi, We have a black lab retriever rescue dog about 3 1/2 years old. There is an area about 75′ x 50′ which would make a good area for the dog. It is located in northern Mn. There is some sort of electronic fencing close by for the next door neighbor’s little dog. Our yard has a slight incline. Which type of fencing do you recommend?

    ADMIN – Hi Pam,

    When a neighbor has a fence nearby (within 6 – 12 feet), it will cause interference with your fence along the common boundary. A good solution is to use a dual frequency system, such as the Perimeter Ultra, that can avoid the interference. The Perimeter Ultra would work well with a Labrador.

  85. Tracy says:

    I’ve got two dogs, one is a border collie mix and one looks a pit mix. The pit mix is a digger and seems to be related to Houdini; she can get out of anywhere. They are both high energy and I am wondering what type of fence you would recommend. The border collie mix is about 65 pounds & the pit mix is about 55 pounds.

    ADMIN – Hi Tracy,

    With a Border Collie mix and a Pittbull mix, you probably want one of the stronger systems (because Pittbulls can often need a stronger correction than the average dog). You also want a system that lets you set different correction levels for each dog (because the Collie is likely to be on a lower correction level). the Dogtek EF-6000 would be a good choice, as would the PetSafe Stubborn.

    The Dogtek is smaller, rechargeable, and give you better control over the boundary. The SportDog has a bigger collar, and uses disposable batteries, but is around $50 cheaper.

  86. Tony says:

    Hello diy-ers and Dog Fence specialists! My wife and I just bought a house with 2.5 acres and we have a most curious lab mix that we would like to keep safe in the yard. Can you tell me what system would be the best for us and send me a list of all the stuff I need to order? I’ve been in the landscaping business for years and have always said when it came time for a dog fence, I could “do it myself” and now I get the chance to put my money where my mouth is 🙂 Thanks!

    ADMIN – Hi Tony,

    Labradors tend to be among the easiest dogs to contain, because they are sensitive to the correction and have that ‘eager to please’ temperament. That means you can use pretty much anything with a lab.

    My top choice would be the new Dogtek EF-6000. It has one of the smaller collar, is rechargeable, and give you a lot more control over the boundary that most systems.

    http://www.dogfencediy.com/reviews/dogtek-ef-6000/

    As well as the basic system, you will need around 2,000 feet of extra wire to cover 2.5 acres. If you don’t have a trencher, renting one will make a big job like that easy – particularly if you get one with a wire-layer built in (they are often used for sprinkler system installs).

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